5 Ways to Facilitate Active Learning

By Kelly Russell, April 4, 2017

The internet has revolutionized the way we learn and drastically streamlined our process of gathering data. For planners, this change means people register for conferences for the experience, not simply to gain new information. Individuals attend a conference to engage with one another and have a firsthand experience.

According to a study from UCLA, the retention rate of listening to a lecture—considered passive learning—is only about 10 percent. However, that retention rate increased to 50 percent when the subjects took notes on the content; grew to 60 to 70 percent when they discussed or collaborated with colleagues; and rose to an impressive 90 percent when they presented the information they learned, the study reports. Foster active participation to optimize the information attendees will retain and therefore increase their ROI by incorporating these five ideas into your education.

Provide structured note taking.

Tap into that 10-to-50-percent retention rate increase by encouraging speakers to provide handouts for attendees to use as they listen. These forms can be fill-in-the-blank style or have a few prompts followed by a section for notes. Speakers can refer to the handouts often, making them an important part of presentations.

Facilitate discussion groups.

Much of the true learning and understanding that occurs at a conference takes place in the hallways. This is where attendees start to socially construct their own understanding of what they just heard. Capture those moments and make them a formal part of the event by adding facilitated discussion groups. Forgo the traditional 90-minute conference lectures and replace them with more 15-minute presentations (think TED Talks style) that serve as catalysts for 75 minutes of facilitated discussion.

  • Patty Hudson Parker

    I recently returned from a conference and one of the most valuable parts was the brainstorming session provided for all interested participants. The synergy and learning taking place during that time was tangible. In addition, we did get to provide feedback regarding the content and it was incredibly valuable and actionable as a result! Great tips!!

An unengaged audience is the worst nightmare for a panel. Planners can assist panelists by suggesting these techniques to connect to the audience.

See how a $20 million renovation imparted a design overhaul and changed MICE prospects for the 90-year-old Talbott Hotel in Chicago’s Gold Coast.

A strong relationship between a DMO and convention center is the backbone of a city that successfully earns meetings business.

To be a more effective negotiator, meeting planners will learn how hotels evaluate their businesses and manage their inventory of space, rates and dates.

Trending