How to Ask for a Raise

By Caroline Cox, March 3, 2017

Asking for a raise is a tricky—and, often, nerve-wracking—process. We asked Robin Ryan, career counselor and best-selling author of “60 Seconds & You’re Hired!”, for her tips on successfully requesting more money. 

Know your worth.

It’s crucial to research what the average rates are for your job based on location, skills and years of experience, says Ryan. “A big mistake I see,” she explains, “is people who have no idea what their skills are worth in the marketplace.” Sites like Glassdoor and PayScale offer free salary reports.

Ask for a raise Robin RyanGo in prepared.

Ryan says role-playing with a friend who will let you practice your pitch for them will help you feel more confident going into the conversation.

Be tactful.

If your boss just left a big meeting or seems frazzled, that’s probably not the time to ask if a raise can be discussed. “Pick a time when your boss is going to be in a good frame of mind, not when they’re preoccupied,” Ryan says.

Prove it.

“You can’t just ask for a raise because you bought a new car or because you heard someone else got one,” says Ryan. “You need to provide proof your skills and responsibility have improved and show how you’re benefiting your employer.” She adds that things like raving event evaluations are ways to show tangible proof of the value you add.

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